grapefruit interaction drugsYes, this lowly fruit (depending on the height of your tree) is practically being called  Public Enemy # 1, by the FDA and a recent article in “Medscape Today“.

Interesting, isn’t it?  I look out at my lovely little grapefruit tree, laden with juicy pink grapefruit, and I feel the need to express my gratitude for this lovely fruit.

But, quickly heartbreak follows as I realize that the days of grapefruit – filled with health and “yummyness” (new word definition: “yummy for the tummy and tongue”) – will soon be over.

This is true for anyone taking pharmaceuticals.  For your protection, if you are someone taking any prescribed drug, it is in your best interest to find out which ones may cause an interaction with grapefruit, and other similar fruit.

It’s been known for a number of years that “anything” grapefruit (juice, seed extract, whole fruit, etc…) can either diminish the potency of the pharmaceutical, or increase its toxicity.

The sad part is there is a growing list of new pharmaceuticals that also interact with grapefruit.  You would think that the whiz scientists could create “new” drugs that don’t  interact.  It would sure help the grapefruit industry, if consumers were once again safe to enjoy their morning grapefruit without guilt or repercussion.

As for me, I am going to enjoy my tree and the fruit thereof – with gratitude that I am not on any pharmaceuticals.  Thankfully, I can enjoy the health benefits of grapefruit (such as vitamin C).

However, for anyone on blood pressure medication, cholesterol medication, and even birth control pills, I would suggest reviewing the links below.  The articles can provide critical health information before “it’s too late”.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/775217
http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm292276.htm

[Editor Note: We have written before about the interaction issues between commonly used drugs and grapefruits.  For over a decade, we have maintained a database on known interactions between drugs and nutritional/herbal/food concerns.  We call this database “Post-Script” to reflect the evidence a consumer should consider after they have been prescribed a drug.  Some of this information can literally save your life. I wonder how many women on birth-control pills know they shouldn’t consume grapefruits (juice or whole fruit)…  in our experience, not very many.  It is a prudent step toward your health and safety to be self-educated about your medications.  We used to provide the information in Post-Script for free, but due to misuse and malicious efforts by some unscrupulous folks who kept attempting to steal the content, ignoring the Copyright notice, we have been forced to take it down.  If enough interest persists, we may later decide to offer access for a nominal fee to help cover the cost for securing the site. For those of you who relied on the in-depth information to stay informed about your medications, we apologize for the disruption, but we thank you for your understanding.]
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